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Letter from Cairo: Spirit of Revolution and Cartoon Signs in Tahrir Square

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I'm so glad I lived to witness this great moment in our history and the history of the whole world, and yet more, to be part of it. The signs people drew at Tahrir Square are simple, but so meaningful.

by Sara Youssuf


The prayers and wishes and concerns and messages from friends overseas really mean a lot to me.

My happiness can not be described by words, though it's mixed with sadness over our martyrs and worry about the future of my country. But I'm so hopeful that the future is brighter. I'm so glad I lived to witness this great moment in our history and the history of the whole world, and yet more, to be part of it.

There is a new blood and new spirit spreading among Egyptians now. It's the spirit of our pure noble revolution. People in Tahrir Square were like one family—with all that this word carries in it—of Muslims and Christians, poor and rich, farmers and workers.

I went with my friends to clean the Square after the revolution, and people were behaving in an amazing positive spirit. Our talk the whole day was about Egypt and how we are so proud to be Egyptians.

Here are three of the signs that people drew in Tahrir Square. The signs are so simple, as people drew them while at Tahrir Square, but they are so meaningful, art classes should look at them.


The first sign shows our Prime Minister Ahmed Nazif saying 'Now, where would I work, after leaving the Ministry?".



The second shows the head of the People's Assembly (Fathi Sroor, nicknamed Toto), and one of the revolutionists is telling him that "Whatever you do, I won't let you in, Toto" . In the background is the People's Assembly building, with a sign saying "Closed Until the Regime is Down".



The third one says "Civil Hospital of Tahrir Square Medical Point", and then it's signed "From People to People". This sign was on a small hospital that people created in the square to help the injured .

Please keep up your prayers for Egypt.


—February 14, 2011


Sara Youssuf teaches English while completing graduate studies in linguistics at Al-Azhar University. In 2009-2010, she was a Fulbright Scholar at Saginaw Valley State University in Michigan, where she taught Arabic language and culture.

 

Copyright © Sara Youssuf 2011. Text and Photos by Sara Youssuf. All rights reserved.

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