70s Rock Must Die

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Godfather of punk, the only thing Biafra proves here is that there's no need to argue; parents just don't understand.

Lard

Reviewed by Aaron Shuman

Friday, June 2 2000, 8:56 PM


If 70s rock must die, why does Jello Biafra have so much fun singing that way on the title cut? Never mind that the avatar of uncool Biafra sets up -- "a rock and roll dude in leather pants...with a face like a turtle, trying to look stoned" -- sounds exactly like Lard co-conspirator and Ministry axeman Al Jourgensen. The real problem is that the song's admonition is not the revelation Biafra intends it to be. Nor is the grey metal dirge Lard has been mining since the late 1980s.

On this EP, the guitars do nothing but unrelent. This is leavened on the best cut, "Volcanus 2000 (We Wipe the World)," with monkish invocation of the multinational corporations which dump their waste anywhere but here. Unfortunately, Biafra does the same, dissing one era by subjecting us to the pinched preachiness of his own.

After seven minutes, it's unclear what exactly Biafra's problem with 70s rock is, except that it's so, well, tacky. Never mind the identity politics found in the clave or glam guitar, nor the worlds of liberation today's DJs craft from the cut-out bin. Godfather of punk, the only thing Biafra proves here is that there's no need to argue; parents just don't understand.

70s Rock Must Die is an Alternative Tentacles release 

Copyright © 2000 by Aaron Shuman. All rights reserved.
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